Category Archives: Uncategorized

Older adult issue – 17 August 2019

This fortnight I have included an article titled ‘RESISTANCE TRAINING FOR OLDER ADULTS – Position Statement From the National Strength and Conditioning Association which was published in the latest issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

In this study, the authors referenced over 600 papers to come up with a consensus on resistance training program variables, physiological adaptations, functional benefits of resistance exercise training and considerations for frailty, sarcopenia, or other chronic conditions.

There is far too much info to try & summarise here, so I encourage you to download & have a good read for yourself, before deciding how you will implement the info therein.

Click the link below to download and let me know what you think!


Exercise profile

In this clip, a client is performing a static hold whilst holding an uneven barbell. This requires him to engage his core musculature in order to maintain a bar position parallel to the ground.

If you are interested in learning more about muscle imbalances like this, click the button below to check out our Rehab Express course.


Infographic – reducing training volume can maintain size & strength

This graphic shows how reducing training volume by one-third allowed participants to maintain gains in size & strength after an 8-week block of training.

The authors found that the same maintenance effect occurred irrespective of whether the volume was distributed over one or two sessions in the week.


New Sport-e-coach course

I am proud to announce that we have released our fourth short course titled ‘Developing your critical eye.’

In this course, I talk about my approach to conducting a static postural appraisal & how to transfer the findings to exercise program design.

To learn more click the button below.

Endurance issue – 05 August 2019

This fortnight I have included an article titled ‘USE OF LOADED CONDITIONING ACTIVITIES TO POTENTIATE MIDDLE- AND LONG-DISTANCE PERFORMANCE: A NARRATIVE REVIEW AND PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS‘ which was published in the latest issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

In this study, the authors looked at the use of a loaded conditioning activity (LCA), which elicits a post-activation potentiation (PAP) response to acutely enhance explosive power performance.

Despite the limited number of studies that have been conducted in this area, the tentative conclusion is that well-trained middle- and long-distance athletes are likely to obtain some benefit, particularly during the early stages of a performance, by including a loaded conditioning activity (LCA) in their warm-up routine.

Despite the limited number of studies that have been conducted in this area, the tentative conclusion is that well-trained middle- and long-distance athletes are likely to obtain some benefit, particularly during the early stages of a performance, by including a loaded conditioning activity (LCA) in their warm-up routine.

It is recommended that middle and long-distance athletes experiment with a warm-up protocol that involves a 5–10-minute self-paced warm-up at a low intensity (60% maximum heart rate) followed 5–10 minutes later by an LCA.

It is likely that a short bout of high-load resistance exercise (4–6 sets 3 5RM) or series of sprint efforts (4–6 sets x 10-secs), which include the addition of a light-moderate load will elicit a PAP response. A recovery of 5–10 minutes should be permitted after the LCA to ensure that fatigue has dissipated sufficiently to realize a benefit to performance.

Click the link below to download and let me know what you think!


Exercise profile

In this clip, a client is performing a static hold whilst holding an uneven barbell. This requires him to engage his core musculature in order to maintain a bar position parallel to the ground.

If you are interested in learning more about muscle imbalances like this, click the button below to check out our Rehab Express course.


Infographic – mental fatigue influences aerobic exercise more than anaerobic

This graphic shows how a cognitively demanding activity negatively influences subsequent aerobic performance moreso than max strength/power efforts.

The authors feel that this might be due to the increased perception of effort rather than any specific physiological phenomenon.


Coach resource

This fortnight’s training resource is titled ‘The Top Five Glute Exercises‘ by Bret Contreras and includes some nice progressions for these core exercises.

Muscular power issue – 20 July 2019

This fortnight I have included an article titled ‘EFFECT OF POSTACTIVATION POTENTIATION ON EXPLOSIVE VERTICAL JUMP: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS ‘ which was published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research July 2019.

The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence surrounding post-activation potentiation (PAP) and it’s effect on explosive vertical power.

The authors examined 36 studies and concluded that indicate that “PAP does not improve vertical jump performance.”

However, the authors go on to note that rest intervals between 3 and 7 minutes provided favorable performance outcomes, whereas rest intervals less than 3 minutes or performing isometric contractions may be detrimental to performance.

The study then concluded that “when appropriate PAP guidelines are followed, an increase in vertical jump performance may be achieved.”

Click the link below to download and let me know what you think!


Exercise profile

In this clip, I demonstrate a simple resisted Waiter’s Bow drill to activate lumbar multifidus. I do this one for clients with low back pain before we start the session.

If you are interested in learning more about muscle imbalances like this, click the button below to check out our Rehab Express course.


Infographic – optomising motor-unit recruitment

This graphic notes the importance of activating high-threshold motor units & lifting to failure to facilitate hypertrophy.

Effort is the key determinant of the level of motor unit recruitment that is used in any muscular contraction. Thus, strength training with light loads can involve high levels of motor unit recruitment even without the presence of fatigue when bar speed is maximal.

However, the level of mechanical tension experienced by the muscle fibers of the high-threshold motor units during these fast contractions is too low to cause any hypertrophy, because of the force-velocity relationship.


Coach resource

This fortnight’s training resource is titled ‘The Ultimate Dynamic Warmup‘ and includes a nice little barefoot sequence that you can apply with your athletes as part of your warm-up.

Strength performance issue – 12 July 2019

This fortnight I have included an article titled ‘Effect of Interset Strategies on Acute Resistance Training Performance and Physiological Responses’ which was published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research July 2019.

The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence surrounding the implementation of interset strategies to optimize acute resistance training performance.

The authors examined 26 studies wherein several studies reported improvements in the number of performed repetitions (i.e., greater total volume load), attenuation of the loss in velocity and power, reduced lactate levels, and in some cases, a decrease in perceived exertion.

The authors noted that the following seemed to be the most effective interset strategies:

  • Dynamic agonist/static antagonist stretching
  • Cooling
  • Aerobic exercise
  • Vibration
  • Individualised heart rate–based intervals.

Click the link below to download and let me know what you think!


Exercise profile

In this clip, I demonstrate a simple resisted Waiter’s Bow drill to activate lumbar multifidus. I do this one for clients with low back pain before we start the session.

If you are interested in learning more about muscle imbalances like this, click the button below to check out our Rehab Express course.


Infographic – volume for hypertrophy

This graphic notes the importance of activating high-threshold motor units & lifting to failure to facilitate hypertrophy. Think about this when you are prescribing your training volume!


Coach resource

This fortnight’s training resource is a periodised plan template that I have used for a number of athletes. Enjoy the built-in equations that will make your life easy when it comes to calculating total training load!

Personal Training Career advice – VET sector qualifications

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For many years the accepted standard for fitness professionals wanting to get started as a Group Exercise Instructor has been the Certificate III in Fitness, while those pursuing a career as a Personal Trainer will complete the Certificate IV in Fitness. Concurrently, we see an alarmingly high drop-out rate of fitness professionals from our industry – as high as 60% within the first 18 months!

 

So where is the problem?

 

If you ask fitness industry employers, they will lay the blame squarely at the feet of the Registered Training Providers (RTO’s) who deliver the Certificate IV in Fitness. Their claim is that RTO’s don’t prepare graduates to succeed. However, if you speak to some RTO’s they will claim that this drop-out is due to a lack of support and guidance for new graduates who are engaged under the predominant sub-contractor model.

 

So who is right & how does this impact your choice of training provider?

 

At Sport-e-coach we speak to many aspiring fitness professionals, with the large majority asking who they should study with and what should they look for when choosing a training provider. Here are some of my thoughts on what I see as key considerations when making this all-important decision.

 

  1. Do they have current relationships with a variety of fitness industry employers?

 An ongoing relationship with industry is vital if your chosen RTO is going to help you with viable career options after graduation. Ask the RTO who their industry partners are and where they place successful students? How proactive are they in maintaining these relationships? You can always validate the RTO’s claims here by asking a few of their industry partners about the quality of their graduates!

 

  1. Do they provide relevant, on-the-job experience?

 Many RTO’s use ‘simulated assessments’ on their campus which is fine, but you should ask yourself ‘how well prepared will I be to train real clients when all I have done is train my classmate in the same environment throughout my course?’ The fitness industry is incredibly diverse, and your chosen training provider should expose you to some of that diversity in its delivery and assessment strategies.

 

  1. How will you stand out from every other personal training graduate?

 What is the training providers point of difference? Just acquiring a standard Certificate IV in Fitness to me, isn’t enough. Look for a provider that offers you multiple qualifications so you can stand out from the crowd when your resume hits the desk of those PT managers!

 

  1. Do you receive personal mentoring or are you just another number in a class?

 Mentoring simply means that you receive individualised support from someone who has ‘been there and done that’ in the fitness industry. You need support and advice that is specific to your situation, rather than broad statements that are open to interpretation. Refer to my earlier comment about the diversity that exists in the Australian fitness industry – to build a successful niche business you will need specific advice from a quality mentor. In my opinion, this is most needed after graduation when you enter the industry and need assistance to build your business.

 

  1. Are you being educated or entertained?

 If you truly want fitness to be your career do you really need to be entertained throughout your training? In my opinion, this is just a way to enhance student satisfaction scores at graduation rather than prepare you for the reality of working as a sub-contractor in the fitness industry. If you are truly self-motivated, your chosen provider simply needs to provide you with the tools you need and offer the right guidance to help you put your skills and knowledge into practice.

 

So there you have it, my 6 tips for choosing a training provider for your vocational fitness qualifications. The question that you probably have right now is ‘who do you recommend?’ There are plenty of great providers out there, but my recommendation is the International Fitness Institute. These guys have a unique course structure that is like nothing else I have seen.

 

Graduates receive 1-on-1 mentoring from successful fitness business owners, are educated in operational fitness environments and graduate with the following qualifications:

  • Level 1 strength & conditioning coach
  • Boxing accreditation
  • Certificate III in Fitness
  • Certificate IV in Fitness

 

On top of that, IFI has a growing list of industry partners in a number of different fitness industry sectors. I have seen their graduates in action and they not only know how to train a wide variety of clients effectively, but they also have strong business acumen – including those all-important marketing and sales skills.